Triple Dog

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Wow. Triple Dog Dare. Where do we start? Formulaic sleep-over movie follows a bunch of over-giggly girls as they endure a game of Triple Dog (truth or dare minus the truth plus shaving of hair), learn handy life lessons about themselves, and eventually uncover the dark secret we were all dying to know (cough).

The aesthetically pleasing cast look like they’ve stepped right out of a Disney pilot so that was alright. It’s too bad they were playing one-dimensional characters covering the majority of high school stereotypes. There’s Sarah, the adorably naive Catholic prude who carries her knitting around;
Cecily, the pretentious rich bitch who as turns out has a heart after all; Liza, the freaky oddball reminiscent of Ally Sheedy circa ‘The Breakfast Club’; skater chick Chapin whose cap cocked to the side just screams ‘extreme!’ and Nina, who’s just… blonde. Oh, and the birthday girl Eve, who appears to be the spineless nice girl. This slow pace movie denies any character development as the girls partake in a rowdy night of streaking, public urination, shoplifting, and faking a seizure in a karaoke bar (have to give kudos to the creativity there).

Between each dare is dishwater dull dialogue that seems to have been penned by a room full of old fogies and their idea of way-cool youth dialect (eg: “chillax”, “totes” and “what the shiz?”) and the ever surprising use of peace as a verb (“I’m peacing”, presuming it’s a derivative of ‘peace out’).

While the plot seems perfect for the target market of young teeny boppers, the swearing and consistent referral to oral sex says otherwise, thus making the intended viewer of this movie blurred. On a plus side, the retelling of the fateful night involving ‘the secret’ through the eyes of different characters does lead to some half-decent directing but does not make amends to the other flaws.

To conclude, this flick certainly isn’t great, but it isn’t horrific either. We were just left with an empty feeling of who the hell cares.

‘Triple Dog’ is available on DVD in January through Pinnacle Films.